Charles Feggans opens his novel “Miller Homes” as follows: “In this story, Miller Homes (in Trenton) is a community housing development known for warehousing low income people."

    This month we reflect upon and express gratitude for people like Patricia Whitehead, who share their experiences to bring the past alive to us all these years later.

    The first step to growing old gracefully is to readily admit that you’re getting old.

    So….masks. There are those who don’t wear them. There are those who wear them. There are those who forget them in the car and have to run back and get them. There are those who have to wear them while they work. There are TV and movie superheroes who wear them because their costume requires it.

    Ewing Township health administrator Teri Vacirca has been immersed in all things COVID these past several months, scheduling residents for vaccines and working on other COVID-related issues for the township. Workdays have been hectic and demanding, but she has found a respite tucked away in …

    Around the 1860’s, in the limited vicinity of Ewingville, Ewing [Presbyterian] Church and Shabbakonk Road, which he considers his ‘neighborhood,’ John Hendrickson recalls that there were from 20 to 30 houses

    There’s a big old gnarled tree on Broad Avenue. It sits outside our neighbor’s fence, with a grassy area between it and the street.

    “I’m a professional barber. I make people feel good and look good. Mostly feel good,” says Joe Festa — affectionately known as the “Mayor of South Warren Street” in the heart of Trenton.

    The first phase of homes in the Ewing Town Center is nearing completion, and the property is now officially open to the public for tours of its Witherspoon Neighborhood.

    I mean no disrespect to moms with girls. That’s a whole other article, for which I am not qualified to write. I’d be interested to hear the stories, though.

    The Township Historic Society started the year off for this column in January with a request for folks to consider recording their memories of life in Ewing in 2020, in their “Voices of Ewing” project.

    Albert Rhodes, new chief of the Ewing Police Department, used to enjoy being part of the action. Now, after a career in public service and working his way up the ranks, he can finally take a step back and observe.

    I seriously doubt any of us would choose to revisit 2020—it was such a difficult and challenging year in so many ways.